Where the Journey Begins

Friday 30 November 2018

Heather-Chloe Taylor developed M.E. and Fibromyalgia after having Glandular Fever, which many chronic illness sufferers can relate to, and this is her own personal story. Her opening words are all too familiar: “I find it hard to remember what my life was like before I developed M.E. I don’t remember what it was like to wake up refreshed and pain free, or what it was like to get through a day without needing to rest.” You can read an extract of Heather-Chloe’s article, Where the Journey Begins, in this month’s blog post.

I find it hard to remember what my life was like before I developed M.E. I don’t remember what it was like to wake up refreshed and pain free, or what it was like to get through a day without needing to rest. When I was twenty I caught Glandular Fever and I don’t know why, but it triggered something in my body that has affected my life for four years now. I remember feeling like I had the flu, I felt run down and generally unwell; my General Practitioner ran tests and told me I was suffering with Glandular Fever and to give it a couple of weeks. A couple of weeks passed, and my sore throat disappeared, but I was left with a fatigue that instead of getting better, was worsening to the point I barely left my bed. More weeks passed, and the fatigue was overwhelming; I woke up tired every morning and no amount of sleep changed it. I was prescribed sleeping tablets and told to stay to a strict schedule at night and set an alarm for morning. It didn’t change anything: it didn’t matter how early I went to bed, or how many hours I slept, the fatigue remained, and I started to feel achy and sore all over.

The next six months consisted of returning to my GP, having blood test after blood test and having it come back clear. I was becoming frustrated at being repeatedly told there was nothing physically wrong with me. I had a history of depression, so doctors kept telling me it was my mood, and my anti-depressants were increased; I was referred for therapy. My mood was suffering, but it wasn’t because I was depressed, it was because I was physically feeling worse and worse, but I was no closer to figuring out what was causing it.

At around nine months my GP diagnosed Post-Viral Fatigue Syndrome reluctantly: she’d run all the tests she could and ruled everything else out. I was referred to a rheumatologist because the aches were getting worse: I started to get pain in all my joints, they would seize up and be tender constantly. The rheumatologist arranged scans of my worst areas, which were my lower back and wrists. I finally felt like something was being done, and I had hope that I might finally get answers, but the scans came back clear, and I was no closer to discovering what was wrong with my body. I remember my final appointment with the rheumatologist well, because it made me feel so hopeless. I was told that physically I was a healthy 21-year-old and there was no reason for the pain and fatigue plaguing my life; again I was told it was my depression and I was told to stay as active as possible and push through the fatigue.

When I turned 22, I was just stumbling through life. I couldn’t work because of the fatigue; it made my life hell. I was repeatedly told to push myself and be as active as I could, but I was struggling to manage the effects the fatigue was having; it was spreading to other aspects of my life. I started to lose my concentration, which was a big thing for me because reading is my passion, but I was finding it hard to focus or concentrate on anything. I started to wake up throughout the night because my muscles had cramped up and my joints were sore where I’d been lying on them. I’d wake up every morning with pain in my hands, shoulders and ankles. I became more clumsy and forgetful, I’d forget things I’d just done, or someone would tell me something and it would just go completely over my head. I even found it hard to hold a conversation at times because my head constantly felt foggy. I started to sweat more, I couldn’t go into shops or out in public because I constantly felt flushed and sweaty, and I didn’t want people to notice.

 

Please continue to Where the Journey Begins for part two of this article.

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News

2 Dec 2018
The Sunday Times Article
30 Nov 2018
Where the Journey Begins
26 Oct 2018
Forward-ME Meetings
18 Oct 2018
New Article Published
13 Aug 2018
M.E. Organisations
10 Jul 2018
Latest Metabolites Research
23 Jun 2018
Westminster Hall Debate
28 Apr 2018
The Synergy Trial

 
 
 

News

2 Dec 2018
The Sunday Times Article
30 Nov 2018
Where the Journey Begins
26 Oct 2018
Forward-ME Meetings
18 Oct 2018
New Article Published
13 Aug 2018
M.E. Organisations
10 Jul 2018
Latest Metabolites Research
23 Jun 2018
Westminster Hall Debate
28 Apr 2018
The Synergy Trial